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20110701
20110731
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at the national museum of scotland. it's opening its doors tomorrow and our scotland correspondent has gone to have a look. >> this is a story of a restless people and a restless nation. scotland's heritage of inventi and discovery put this small country on the map. the power of the steam engine revolutionized industry. the television changed the lives of millions. and scots sent back structures from afar. >> scots were great inventors and explore rers and colonial explorers were missionaries. in many ways the stories we tell here are in part the story of scotland's engagement with the rest of the world. >> there are much older tales like t-rex and the national history gallery. in here there are stories of survival and some of the exhibits themselves have survived for decade in the freezer. some date back to the 19th century. now they're being used again to teach the theory of evolution. charles darwin once lived on the site of the museum. he was just a student in scotland but this man's discovery for discoverying penicillin is a gem in they can electic museum. >> we have a chance to bring
the scandal seems to be far from over. scotland yard say they have identified 4000 possible hacking victims. an inquiry will start into possible wrongdoing by police officers. we have the latest on that part of the case. >> this famous newspaper titles may have been confined to history, but the scrutiny of its methods goes on. britain's most senior policeman has officers investigating whether other officers were bribed by journalists. >> a small group of officers may have engaged in these practices. i will determine to do what we should do, and that is proceed to criminal courts. >> a former employee told the court last year as a witness that he knew nothing about payments from the police or to the police. e-mails have been provided the raise serious questions. >> someone from news international is misleading us. he has to answer a perjury charge, and that is very serious. >> tonight, it is reported that he will be arrested after setting himself to a police station for questioning. scotland yard says its investigation will be robust, whereas in the past, insiders say it has fallen short. on
, "bbc world news america." >> this is "bbc world news america." scotland yard is under fire. a second top boss goes as the u.k. phone hacking scandal spreads. >> those who take on the most difficult jobs have to stand up and be counted when things go wrong. >> a former reporter and source of a number of the allegations has been found dead. gaddafi must go. that is the message u.s. officials say they delivered in face-to-face talks with representatives of the libyan leader. training for the london olympics. someone from trinidad is overcoming obstacles to make his country prague. -- proud. " welcome to our viewers on pbs and around the globe. each day brings a new twist in the scandal that has engulfed britain. today was no exception. first the news of the second high-profile resignations and scotland yard in 24 hours when john yates announced he was stepping down. then a former "news of the world" reporter that alleged widespread hacking was found dead. the circumstances are not believed to be suspicious. nick robinson reports. >> he resigned just a day after his boss, commissioner pa
criticism of the police was that either there was some kind of cover-up at scotland yard about these allegations, or that they did not realize the seriousness of them at the time. one of the senior policeman in charge of scotland yard, when these allegations first came to light, is just reminding mp's that at the time they were dealing with massive counterterrorism problems, the attacks on 7/7 on the london transport system. at the time, phone hacking was not the priority, but with hindsight, it is obvious it should have been. >> good to see you. thanks. president karzai's half brother, wally tahlak med ahmad karzai, has been shot dead. with a controversial figure. the taliban has claimed responsibility for the attack. a few months ago, he was interviewed. >> it is quite extraordinary. we were in kandahar for a film in april, and i noted how many layers of security, barb wire, barriers, concrete walls that he had around his compaq and -- of around his compound. i told him he must be in the most heavily secured building in kandahar, and he said, "i have been attacked many times.
, a small number of families have been told by scotland yard that there details were discovered as part of the latest investigation into hacking. this family lost their son in the bombing. the address and phone numbers were in a file. >> we receive personal phone calls from friends and family. to think that when you are at the lowest time of your life, someone for the sake of a story might be listening to you, it is horrendous. >> there has been a separate development related to the former news of the world director. e-mails were run cover that showed that he derived payments from police officers. a subject that both he and his boss for a fact about that a poll -- parliamentary committee. >> will you do it in the future? there is a clear public interest. what ever you want to talk about. >> of course he went on to become the director of communications for a time. the emergency debate on hacking will bring renewed questions on the prime ministers and judgment in hiring him. some believe that a public inquiry is the only way to make sure that it never happens again. >> we have an over-fam
. the latest claims prompt more uncomfortable questions about whether a blind eye was turned at scotland yard. >> for more on this uproar and the culture which surrounds the british tabloids, i spoke with a reporter from one the best of this as a result of a unique issue with british tabloid journalism. >> i think there is a different newspaper culture. the national enquirer in america is about as close as you are going to get to some of the tabloid tone that we have in our best selling newspapers. i suppose if you imagine the national enquirer was the best- selling newspaper in america, he would have the understanding of the state of journalism here. >> what are the pressures on reporters and editors to come up with stories like this and sail close to the legal wednesday to separate >> immense. -- close to the legal winds to do this. >> demands. we are in a situation or circulation is falling and there is a battle for readers. that pushes people ever closer to the legal line and the moral line and ethical line of journalism. as we have seen with these latest revelations, hacking into the pho
of growing perception that scotland yards had a cozy relationship with news international. both men are hoping when the inquiry happens they are vend indicated. but it was pretty clear yesterday and the day before that the politicians, their patience snapped with the police because they felt they had not been given the true picture of links between news international and the police. >> and sir paul season son and his resignation made a very barbed reference to the prime minister. how worried is the government about what could come out of these hearings which will go on about another hour and a half. they are liberated. until now they had to worry about their careers. now they don't. that is dangerous for david cameron because they may feel where they canum say what they feel. the his is over links with staff. >> yes, he says there is a double standard that he had to go over his links with news international yet david cameron hasn't yet apologized to the british public for hiring a former news editor of the news of the world. >> thanks. that apology is what is being demanded. it is h
bombing, still alive, almost two years after he was sent home from scotland with terminal cancer. al-megrahi. we found more of this supporters on the front line with the rebels. nato has not been able to get them to surrender. it has been bombing since march. nato aircraft have made more than 16,000 sorties. they have carried out more than 6000 air strikes. still, the colonel remains. four rebels in eastern libya, moammar gaddafi's fate is cause for argument. some insist he has no future inside his country. >> we understand the libyan people want him to leave the country and power, so this is our stand as of today. >> others suggest that the colonel does not have to go into exile. word that britain and france are prepared to let colonel gaddafi stay inside libya is seen by the supporters of the commonwealth as an admission that nato and the rebels cannot get rid of the libyan leader -- seen by the supporters of colonel gaddafi as an admission. giving up, long before the leader ever does. james reynolds, bbc news, in tripoli. >> you are watching "bbc world news america." still to come
of scotland yard who resigned sunday. the hearings comes after ten arrests and a series of resignatns as fallout from the phone hacking scandal grows. with me john burns, ian katz, deputy he had tortd of the guardian and david karr of the new york city times and sh tyrangiel edito of newsweek. ian katz, what does this day whh rupert murdochcalled the humblest day of his life. what does it change and where do we go from here? >> well, it's not a day we learn an awful lot of significant things. if anything the clearest lesson is wendy dang has a formidable right hook but it was a day of quite striking theatre i think. for in who sits in this country the idea of rupert murdoch who two weeks ago was the most powerful person.country being hauled into parliament to answer questions is prett pretty extraordinary and we had the dialog of him saying it was the humblest day of his lif that w pretty striking. the interesting thing is he and james murdoch came in saying sorry and contrition if you lied but the message was we're sorry but it wasn't else, was someone else's fault and that's the bi
of the world" also worked simultaneously, if you'll pardon the pun, as a translator for scotland yard. there was also somebody who was working both as the chief correspondent -- or chief reporter of the paper. as a police informant. so the -- there was almost no delineation at times between where news international finished around scland yard began. it was really extraordinary. >> rose: there was a headline,lm reuters saying, is britain more corrupt it thinks? >> i tnk we need to be careful before moving too far in that direction. this is not italy. this is certainly not a banana republic. what we've seen is an entangling of media and politicians and police, a kind of causeuasi new establishment with roles not being clearly enough defined. i think the second point to makeis that let's not forget britain has a very vibrant competitive press. and this story was exposed, not by a police inquire race, not by a parliamentary committee, but by a leading british newspaper "the guardian," helped a little bit by "the new york times," which crucially broke the story that broke the news internat
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)

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